The following are transcriptions from a letter book of Bramford Parish Council from the early 1900’s.  They are believed to have been passed down from Edgar Eaborn who was Parish Clerk from 1927.
Unfortunately they only gives one side of the correspondence but they do give us a little insight into what occupied the day-to-day business of the Parish Council at that time.  These letters have been selected because they mention people or places or other matters that may be of interest to readers.
The originals are mainly handwritten in a beautiful copperplate script by Harry Parker, the Parish Clerk, over a period of about twenty years.  Some of the writing is indistinct due to deterioration of the ink and paper over time.

Note:
Harry Holmes Parker was born in Bramford around 1870 and was the son of Walter and Pamela Parker.  He married Gertrude Elizabeth Mee in 1893.  In 1911 Harry was a clerk and timekeeper for a chemical manure manufacturer (Edward Packard & Co) and lived in Paper Mill Lane with Gertrude and family, Winifred (17), Cecil (16), Blanche (12) and Reginald (4).

Bramford December 12th 1905

To
The Chairman of the District Council, Bosmere and Claydon Union

Sir,

I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council to write calling your attention to the very bad state of repair of the roads under the control of the District Council of the Bosmere & Claydon Union, in this, the Parish of Bramford; & further to add, that it is the unanimous opinion of the Council, that at the present moment the roads in question are in a worse state of repair than they have been for many years past; & that they consider the treatment meted out to the Parish of Bramford in respect of District roads most unfair, considering the large proportion of the District rate that the Parish contributes for the maintenance of the roads.
The Parish Council also thinks that where materials are offered for use by Messrs. E Packard & Co for the repair of the paths that advantage should be taken of such offer.
The Parish Council request that you will press your surveyor to give the above matter his serious attention.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford December 12th 1905

To
The Chairman of the District Council, Bosmere and Claydon Union

Sir,

I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council, to forward you copies of the following resolutions passed by them, at a meeting held on the 11th inst.
Viz:-
(i) “That the District Council to be asked to instruct their Inspector of Nuisances to give his attention to the drains running into the River near the Bramford Bridge,
there still being one which is frequently a nuisance, owing to the bad smell arising from same.”
(ii) “That the District Council be asked to make up & repair the Mill Lane, Bramford; between the Police Station & Messrs Cooper & Sons Mill.”

The Parish Council will be glad if the District Council will give these matters their immediate attention.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford October 30th 1906

(Addressee illegible)

Dear Sir,

Will you kindly inform me by whose authority the Bramford Parish room is used by the Carpentry Class, held under the E. S. Education Committee on Thursday evenings.
The Bramford Parish Council Room Committee does not appear to have been consulted.
Your early reply will oblige.

Yours faithfully
H H Parker
Clerk to B.P.C.

Bramford November 6th 1906

To
The Revd. A W Payne
The Vicarage
Bramford

Revd. Sir

Referring to your letter Re. the letting of the Parish Room.
I have laid the matter before the Parish Council Room Committee & am instructed by them to inform you, that they have not been applied to, for the use of the Room, by the E.S. Education Committee, for the Carpentry Class, or the Reading Room Committee & that both the E.S. Education Committee & the Parish Reading Room Committee are using the Room without the proper authority.
The Parish Council Room Committee have however, decided to bring the matter before the Bramford Parish Council at their next meeting.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford 14th November 1906

To
W E Kersey Esq
Solicitor
Ipswich

Dear Sir,

In reply to yours of 9th inst. the Bramford Manorial Rights are assessed:
Gross £6. 0s. 0d.
Rateable £5. 0s.0d. @ 2s/5d in the pound = 12s/ 1d

Yours faithfully

H H Parker
Assistant Overseer

Bramford 3rd April 1907

To
Hy Miller Esq.
County Surveyor
County Hall
Ipswich

Dear Sir,

I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council, to call your attention to a dangerous portion of the main road through the Bramford Street.
The particular spot referred to, is between the Royal Oak Inn & the Bake Office.

Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford Parish Council April 23rd 1907

To
The Chairman of the District Council, Bosmere and Claydon Union

Sir,

I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council, to request the Bosmere & Claydon District Council to reconsider their decision of [blank space] not to take over “Mill” Lane, Bramford as requested by the Bramford Parish Council & at the same time to inform the District Council of Bosmere & Claydon that should they not see their way to take over “Mill” Lane, the Bramford Parish Council will be under the necessity of applying to the County Council to take it over.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford 3rd June 1907

To

D C Warner [Warne]
The Lodge
Bramford

Dear Sir,

In reply to yours of 31st Ulto, the properties to which the making up of the “Mill” Lane Bramford would be a convenience are as follows:-

                Gross        Rateable
Messrs Cooper & Sons (Mill)    £100. 0.        £65. 0.
C H Shipston (House & Garden)    £17. 0.        £15. 0.
A J Gibbons (4 Cottages)    £36. 0.        £32. 0.
Charles Hood (Mangers)    £14. 0.        £12. 10.
F G Bovill (Maltings )        £8. 0.        £7. 0.
Bowman & Sons (Bake Office)    £12. 0        £10. 15.

Referring to your remark that the District Councillors representing the Parish should be informed of these matters, I will at the next meeting draw the attention of the Parish Council to this matter & to which I am quite sure they will agree.
Mr Jackson however was present when this matter was brought before the Parish Council & to the best of my belief seconded the proposition so must have known about it.
The Bramford Parish Council or the District Council have not to the best of my belief ever done any repairs to the road in question.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford 21st October 1907

To
The Chairman,
Roads & Bridges Committee
East Suffolk County Council

Sir,
I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council to convey to you the following:-
“That in consequence of the refusal of the Bosmere and Claydon Rural District to take over & repair the “Mill” lane in Bramford, the Bramford Parish Council request the East Suffolk County Council to institute an inquiry respecting their application to the District Council.”
Applications to the District Council respecting the taking over of the above mentioned lane were made by the Bramford Parish Council in January 1906 and again in April 1907.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford May 7th 1908

To
 Mr Clover
Nurseryman
Westgate Street
Ipswich

Dear Sir,

I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council, to ask you to kindly lower and repair the fence at the top portion of your field alongside the footpath leading from off the Bramford Road to the Railway Station, as in its present condition, it is a nuisance to the public, and will not allow the path to dry.
The present condition of the path & fence is apparently caused by your (or your tenants) fowls being allowed to stray.
Your early attention to the above will oblige.

Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford Parish Council March 29th 1909

To
? Cobbold Esq
Clerk to E. S. County Council

Sir,

I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council to claim from the East Suffolk County Council, rental of 10s/- per annum for hire of the shed, the property of the Parish of Bramford, which is occupied by the County Council for the storage of tools.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council

Bramford Parish Council May 2nd 1910

Philip Palmer Esq
Thornham
Eye

Dear Sir,

I am instructed by the Bramford Parish Council to ask you on behalf of Sir Lambton Loraine Bt. if you will sanction the fixing up of a Notice Board by the Parish Council prohibiting the shooting of rubbish (tins etc) on the Camping lane, Bramford as in its present state it has a very untidy appearance.

I am, Sir
Yours faithfully
Harry H Parker
Clerk to the Bramford Parish Council
The reference to the Camping Lane in this letter is an area at the bottom of what is Ravens Lane today.  Camping Lane was probably just another alternative for what was known as “Mill Lane” or even “Back Lane” until the modern names of Ravens Lane and Mill Lane for the (lower end) were settled on.  The “Campo” as it was known in the mid 20th century was an area used as a sort of informal playground or public space.  A Cycle speedway track was there in the 1950’s  when this activity was popular and a “Mission Hut”  or “Tin Tabernacle” was sited there for a time.
The name “Campo” was thought, by some, to refer to the actual activity of living in tents or caravans but probably goes back further to the very old game of “Camp” or “Camping” which was played in the 18th and 19th Centuries.
The game of “Camp” is described here by Edward Moor in1823 in his book “Suffolk Words and Phrases”:
Each party has two goals, ten or fifteen yards apart. The parties, ten or fifteen on a side, stand in line, facing each other at about ten yards’ distance midway between their goals and that of their adversaries. An indifferent spectator throws up a ball the size of a cricket ball midway between the confronted players and makes his escape. The rush is to catch the falling ball. He who first can catch or seize it speeds home, making his way through his opponents and aided by his own sidesmen. If caught and held or rather in danger of being held, for if caught with the ball in possession he loses a snotch, he throws the ball [he must in no case give it] to some less beleaguered friend more free and more in breath than himself, who if it be not arrested in its course or be jostled away by the eager and watchful adversaries, catches it; and he in like manner hastens homeward, in like manner pursued, annoyed and aided, winning the notch or snotch if he contrive to carry or throw it within the goals. At a loss and gain of a snotch a recommencement takes place. When the game is decided by snotches seven or nine are the game, and these if the parties be well matched take two or three hours to win. Sometimes a large football was used; the game was then called “kicking camp”; and if played with the shoes on “savage camp.”

It wasn’t uncommon for serious injury or death to occur during some of these matches which probably lead to its decline in the 19th Century.