Ipswich Evening Star 19th October 1908

Garrigill Church Cumberland

Garrigill Church Cumberland

It will be remembered that some time ago the three-light east window in Bramford Parish Church was removed, that a five-light window might take its place. The three-light window after removal, was passed on, by the Vicar and churchwardens, to the Vicar of All Saints, Ipswich (Rev. Caesar Caine), with the hope that it might be utilised in his parish. It should be borne in mind, in this connection, that All Saints’ Parish is in part formed out of Bramford Parish. This is not the only gift which has been made by Bramford to All Saints. The choir seats at St. Thomas’ Mission Church were formerly part of the furniture of Bramford Church.
No opportunity presenting itself for utilising the window locally, Rev. Caesar Caine obtained permission to present the window to his former church in Cumberland – Garrigill – about which he has recently written an exhaustive history under the title of “Capella de Gerardegile”. The offer was very eagerly accepted, and the window was placed in the hands of Messrs Pearce, of Birmingham, to be restored, a firm whose work may be seen at St Mary-le-Tower and other local churches. In due course the window has been erected exactly as it stood at Bramford, though it is so longer an East end window. It occupies a space on the north wall of Garrigill Church.

The Chancel

The Chancel

The stonework of the window has been well executed by Mr Burkett, of Alston, according to plans supplied by Messrs Pearce. The window is not of the mediaeval type which is being so rigidly copied at the present time as, for instance, in the work of the late Mr Kemp, but is a “picture” window of the Continental pattern. The window looks exceedingly well, and is as good as an absolutely new piece of workmanship. It is admirably adapted to its present position and its new custodians in the Cumberland mountain village are very proud of their recent acquisition. This the Bramford people will be very glad to know.
Services in connection with the dedication were held on Sunday, the preacher being Rev. Caesar Caine, who also read the dedicatory Prayer. He said that the whole chapelry was enriched by having in their midst a work of art which, with the renovation and its new setting in stone, was worth £300. The window was to perpetuate the memory of one of his predecessors who laboured there as priest and schoolmaster for 25 years – Rev. George. Monkhouse. The greatest interest was shown in the event by residents in the neighbouring parishes. At night accommodation could not be found for those seeking admission to the church. The collections were marked by great liberality, and almost the entire cost has been speedily covered.